Posts tagged Software

SAIC Uundergraduate Exhibition Tomorrow at 7 PM
Sullivan Galleries, 33 South State Street
I’ll be showing ConversationPool V7:

ConversationPool uses a series of wired and wireless sensors in conjunction with leaked FBI source code to exploit trusted networks in the name of art. Once the ConversationPool hardware has been installed on a network images from user’s browsing sessions are collected and stored in a central database. Each image in the repository is analyzed for colors, shapes, and human faces. Algorithmically ConversationPool pulls what it considers to be the most interesting images and generates a new collage in real time. Image characteristics and placement of images within the collage are carefully considered as the code builds a new composition. ConversationPool is a microcosm of the internet as a whole, where user’s online habits are tracked and composited to form a digital self, all transparently and without our consent. 

Pacific Coast Highway, 16,165 frames.

Pacific Coast Highway, 16,165 frames.

Train video average. 1,457 frames.

Train video average. 1,457 frames.

Made it back to Chicago alive. Working on a few averages from all of the video Harvey and I shot along the way. Here’s 4,323 frames from our drive along the Pacific Coast Highway.

Made it back to Chicago alive. Working on a few averages from all of the video Harvey and I shot along the way. Here’s 4,323 frames from our drive along the Pacific Coast Highway.

Putting a few frames together to test…

Differencing and averaging radar data… Only about 140 samples so far, but I think it’s coming along nicely. (Going to let it run for about a month straight.)

Differencing and averaging radar data… Only about 140 samples so far, but I think it’s coming along nicely. (Going to let it run for about a month straight.)

Conversation Pool is a project I’m working on that listens to web traffic on a network and pulls out images as people browse. The images the analyzed using OpenCV and similar shapes, faces, and colors are picked out of each image. The Conversation Pool software assembles a collage in real time. 

The software is nowhere near finished, but it’s analyzing properly, and it doesn’t crash every five minutes now! I’m working on the branching code right now to help create more dynamic compositions (it prefers the center of the screen a little much right now). 

Posting something on the internet counts as a ghost of done, so here it is.

Same project and same code as before, but with a unified Z-axis. In this mode hosts that are generating a lot of traffic form structures. My machine is the large grey tower.

My NetEnvironment project. Using Processing and the FBI’s Carnivore source code to generate a real time 3D environment that reflects current traffic on a network.

The code sniffs for all TCP/UDP connections and plots machines (cubes) and then draws connections between two machines (curves). 

In this version higher port numbers (I had BitTorrent running) are higher in space, and lower port number are lower in space (take a close look when I refresh The New York Times website).

Super basic and super slow at this point, but hey, it works!

I’m working on a small appliance to display CTA train and bus arrival times via an analog voltage meter.

(Yes, I bring breadboards to the coffeeshop.)

A point cloud from my Kinect using Daniel Shiffman’s Processing library! I struggled all day with this damn thing: weird Java errors, USB problems, and finally learning to tell my Mac Pro to wait patiently. 

Prototype for testing code for my fabric display project. In the video this little guy isn’t tracking clouds and manipulating fabric like the real machine will be. Instead, it’s using the camera in my Mac to look for faces (see the red box around my face?) and trying to match the location of the faces my moving side to side and up and down. 

MSAFluid, running on Harvey and I’s multitouch table.

SketchBot: Proof of Concept. So I’m working on making an interactive drawing robot using a Roomba, an Arduino, and one of adafruit’s lovely motor shields. After a few weeks and a lot learned, this is what I have so far. Full control of the Roomba, and I know where the pen is at. (The curly red thing going back and forth is a temporary mount for the pen.)